Cage-free, free range, organic eggs: what all those labels really mean

If you’ve ever bought eggs in a supermarket, you’ve probably faced this conundrum: do I buy the regular, cheap eggs, or the nicer, organic/cage-free eggs? And supposing you want to spring for the humane stuff, how do you know which farms are really treating their hens right, and which are just throwing up smoke and mirrors? The short answer: yes, you should be buying cage-free eggs. But the case for buying organic or free-range eggs isn’t very compelling. When shopping around, be sure to look for “Certified Humane” and, even better, “Animal Welfare Approved” stickers on your eggs. They’re your best bet if you love egg products but want to be sure the hens laying them are being treated well. Most eggs are produced in a way that severely hurts chickens. About 97 percent of egg-laying hens in the United States are confined to what are known as “battery cages,” holding 5 to 10 birds each, with United Egg Producers’ minimum standards mandating 67 square inches per bird — a smaller space than a standard 8.5-by-11-inch piece of paper (UEP estimates that about 15 percent of hens are raised by farmers that don’t eve...

Case Farms cited by USDA for 33 inhumane violations, report says | News

Thunderstorms likely this evening. Then the chance of scattered thunderstorms overnight. Storms may contain strong gusty winds. Low 66F. Winds light and variable. Chance of rain 100%.. Thunderstorms likely this evening. Then the chance of scattered thunderstorms overnight. Storms may contain strong gusty winds. Low 66F. Winds light and variable. Chance of rain 100%. This image shows a chicken being hung upside down at a poultry processing plant. Case Farms also uses a “live shackling” technique during the slaughtering process at its plant.  This diagram of how chickens are slaughtered was included in a report, which stated that Case Farms of Morganton had 33 inhumane violations in 2015 and 2016.  Case Farms said it has “zero tolerance for in-humane, cruel and unethical treatment of birds” following a report of 33 inhumane violations from the USDA between 2015 and 2016.. This image shows a chicken being hung upside down at a poultry processing plant. Case Farms also uses a “live shackling” technique during the slaughtering process at its plant.  Case Farms said it has “zero tolerance for in-humane, cruel and unethical treatment of birds&...